How To: Pick your first bow
By: Justin Wegner

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With bow season just around the corner here in Texas there’s many who are going to be up in a tree or in a blind opening day, doing what they’ve done for years on end. With that there will be a whole new set of new hunters taking the field. If you’re just starting into bow hunting or just want to get into target practice, here’s a complete list of what to look for when purchasing your first bow.final-dsc_0216

Check out Local Bow Shops

First go to your local big box store, Bass Pro, Cabela’s, Academy, etc. get a feel for prices and brands there. Now, most of those won’t have your “bigger” brands like Mathews, Hoyt, etc but they will usually have someone reputable and generally nice to talk to about bows. I surely wouldn’t purchase a bow from there just yet, hold out until you can get to a local bow shop and talk to someone who lives, eats, and breathes bows. Reason for that is, almost every bow shop I have been into, if you’re new to bows, they can have a tendency to come off a bit annoyed. I don’t understand it but I have been to 2 in North Texas and have felt that way, and I am not even new to shooting bows. I am looking forward to going to trying out Cinnamon Creek Ranch, because out of the ones I have seen online they “seem” like they’d be helpful to all walks of life.   

Here’s what I would ask for:

  • Bow (obviously)
  • Release
  • Stabilizer
  • Peep
  • Bow Sight
  • Kisser
  • Arrows
  • Decent Layered Target to Shoot

 

Should I purchase a used bow?

Short answer is yes! If you’re new to shooting bows this is often the best way to get a good bow that is set up with more than just the entry level gear. Picking a used bow can some caveats. Likely if you’re reading this you may not have as much experience looking for any damage to the bow that isn’t “visible”. Any bow you shoot or buy you want the up-most safest set-up you can get, otherwise you’re subject to serious injury or even a horrible time at shooting period. As you can tell from the diagram that there’s plenty to learn about the compound bow. Many areas of fault that could be potential hazards if not properly inspected or checked.

compound-bow-diagram

 

Overall how much is a set up for a bow?

Price is obviously the deciding factor for us. When you start looking into bows you quickly see there’s a wide price range. Overall, with a new set up you’re probably looking anywhere from $500 – $1000. Plus whatever arrows you go for. Advice on price, if you can afford a little more than the base entry level gear, you’re probably going to be a little more pleased in the long run.

My Bow Setup:

  • Mathews Creed
  • Axion Archery 3 pin site
  • Tru-Glo Release
  • Peep Sight
  • Victory V-Force V1 Arrows (some of the best shooting arrows I know)
  • Wickstick Stabilizer (<< check out full review)

In conclusion, just make sure you start out this process with patience. Shooting bows isn’t something that you get great at overnight. It take lots and lots of practice. In fact, I try to shoot everyday. When I do I shoot about 10 – 15 rounds, that amounts to 30 – 45 arrows a day. Start with low weight, you don’t need to be pulling back 70 pounds on your first bow. I would probably start around 50 lbs and increase from there. Consult the bow shop or send us any question, I would be happy to help anyway I could.

 

 

Justin

Wegner

A natural outdoorsman with over 20 years of hunting under his belt. More From Justin